Diagnostics

Colonoscopy

We provide a first-class colonoscopy service to investigate problems in the bowel and diagnose conditions affecting the colon.

£1,900.00

Quick facts

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What is it for?

To diagnose conditions affecting the colon

Overview

A colonoscopy involves a long, thin, flexible tube (colonoscope) being inserted into your anus, gently passed through your large bowel and into the last part of your small intestine.

At the end of the tube are a camera and light that allow your consultant to investigate problems in the bowel and diagnose conditions affecting the colon.

For example, a colonoscopy is currently thought of as the best screening test for bowel cancer.

Your consultant can also attach tiny surgical instruments to the end of the tube to take samples of body tissue (biopsies) or remove small polyps (small clumps of cells).

At The London Clinic, we offer our colonoscopy service in our calm and comfortable Endoscopy Unit. Our patients have given the unit a satisfaction rating of over 98%.

Our world-leading gastroenterologists, endoscopists and nursing team will provide you with exceptional personalised care throughout your time with us.

We’re also the only independent private healthcare provider which offers a colonoscopy service on Saturdays as well as weekdays, making life easier for you.

Contact us today to find out more about our colonoscopy service and start your five-star experience with The London Clinic.

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Why might I need a colonoscopy?

Your consultant may recommend a colonoscopy as a routine screening test for bowel cancer.

They are more likely to do this if you have a history of polyps or inflammatory bowel disease, or you have close family that have had bowel cancer.

A colonoscopy may also be used to diagnose conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, diverticular disease and cancer.

Your doctor may use a colonoscopy to investigate new bowel symptoms including:

  • Bleeding from the back passage
  • Unexplained anaemia
  • Chronic diarrhoea or constipation
  • Weight loss
  • Abdominal pain
  • Slime or mucus in the stools
  • Suspected polyps

Why choose The London Clinic

Excellence in one place

We operate as teams of experts with world-class resources dedicated to maintaining the highest standards of medical care. You are surrounded by the latest treatments and advice with everything you need to get back to your best health.

Personal care, every time

Exceptional patient care is a way of life for us. Our nurses, clinicians and support teams are dedicated to the care of a very small number of patients, so have more time for you. They’ll be with you every step of the way, tailoring your care around you and giving the peace-of-mind that comes with knowing you’re in the best hands.

Effortlessly simple

We work together as one to guide you through each step of your experience, with complexities unravelled and answers readily to hand. Your personal treatment plan will be laid out for you, with all the details taken care of so you can focus on you.

How much does a colonoscopy cost?

A colonoscopy at The London Clinic costs from £1,900

  • Enhanced pre-admission assessment
  • Your treatment with our complete care team at your fingertips
  • Personalised aftercare and follow-up

We want you to be in control of your health. That's why we also offer optional services such as comprehensive recover packages and extra touches for you to choose from during your stay with us.  

How to pay

  • You can use private medical insurance (PMI) to access shoulder surgery (rotator cuff) treatment. We work with all major PMI providers in the UK and many internationally 

  • You can pay for yourself (self-pay) 

  • If you're paying for yourself, we have finance options available with Chrysalis

Find out more about paying for your treatment 

FAQs

Your world-leading consultant will perform your colonoscopy as an outpatient procedure.

If you are worried about the procedure, we’ll offer you medication, such as a sedative, to help you feel more relaxed.

During your colonoscopy, you’ll lie on your side on an examination couch, with your knees drawn up towards your chest.

Your consultant will squeeze some liquid or gel into your back passage that allows for smooth movement.

They will then insert a long, thin, flexible tube (colonoscope) into your anus, then gently guide it through the bowel and into the last part of your small intestine.

They may also pump small amounts of air or carbon dioxide gas into your bowel. The air or carbon dioxide inflates the colon, which provides a better view of the lining of the bowel.

A camera at the end of the colonoscope sends high-quality images of the inside of your bowel to a computer screen.

Your consultant looks at the screen during the investigation to pick up on anything that doesn’t look right.

During your colonoscopy, your consultant may also use tiny surgical instruments at the end of the tube to take body tissue samples (biopsies) or remove polyps or other abnormal growths.

A colonoscopy usually lasts less than 30 minutes, but this will depend on whether any biopsies are taken or polyps removed.

Before your colonoscopy, you'll need to empty your bowel. This is to help your consultant get clear views of the inside of your colon.

To empty your bowel, you’ll be given pills or medicine, such as a laxative, to take the day before your procedure.

You’ll also be given detailed information by your expert multidisciplinary team about what you can eat and drink before your colonoscopy.

This may include them advising you to eat more low roughage foods. Roughage is the part of food that is not fully digested as it passes through the bowel.

If you normally take medication or supplements, your care team will also discuss with you if you need to stop taking these and the best times to do so.

After your colonoscopy, you’ll recover in our calming and comfortable Endoscopy Unit until you feel ready to go home.

For most people, this doesn’t take long and you’ll be able to return to your normal activities straightaway.

However, if any large polyps were removed, you should rest and recover at home for a day, to help prevent bleeding.

If you were sedated during your colonoscopy, you’ll recover in our purpose-built unit for about an hour afterwards.

You’ll need to arrange for someone to take you home, and we recommend someone stays overnight with you as well.

We also advise that you don’t drink alcohol, drive, work or operate machinery for 24 hours, as you won’t be as mentally alert as usual.

After your procedure, you may experience wind and cramping pain, which should soon settle down.

Our nursing team will offer you painkillers to ease any discomfort, and a hot water bottle can also help.

Your multidisciplinary team of gastroenterologists, endoscopists and specialist nurses will work closely together to reduce any risk and support your safe recovery.

Rarely, complications of a colonoscopy may include:

  • Bleeding from where a tissue sample (biopsy) was taken, or a polyp or other abnormal growth was removed
  • Tearing (perforation) in the colon or rectum wall
  • A reaction to the sedative used during the procedure

Your consultant may be able to discuss what they’ve seen during your colonoscopy as soon as you feel able to chat.

They may also arrange an appointment to discuss the results of tests carried out on any body tissue or polyps removed during your procedure.

These results are usually available in three to four working days.

At this appointment, your consultant may explain your diagnosis, discuss your treatment options and chat through any worries you may have.

They could also recommend a follow-up colonoscopy. But this will depend on the results of your tests, the size and number of polyps found, your age and other risk factors.

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