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Enquiries
General enquiries:
+44 (0)207 935 4444
Book an appointment:
+44 (0)207 616 7693
Self-pay enquiry:
+44 (0)203 219 3315

Kidney stones can be detected using X-Rays or scans to determine their presence and location.

Sometimes intravenous (IV), the injection of fluids into the bloodstream through a vein, will speed up the passage of stones by producing larger volumes of more dilute urine. Taking sodium citrate or sodium bicarbonate can break down the stones and prevent further stone formation by making the urine more alkaline.

If your urologist believes that the stone is too big to pass unaided or is causing an obstruction, you may need surgery to remove it.  

Tunnel surgery or percutaneous nephrolithotomy

This involves inserting a thin telescopic instrument called a nephroscope through your back into the kidney, the surgeon inserts a surgical instrument and removes the stone.This is performed under general anaesthetic.

Ureterorenoscopy

While you are under general anaesthetic, a long thin telescope, called a ureteroscope is inserted through the urinary tract to view and then either destroy or gently remove the kidney stone.

Please note that The London Clinic no longer offers lithotripsy as an option.

Can kidney stones be prevented?

Often, kidney stones will recur in people who have had them before; however, there are steps you can take to reduce the risk of developing kidney stones:

  • Drink more water on a daily basis: at least 2 litres each day.
  • Limit your intake of caffeinated drinks and alcohol, which can be dehydrating.
  • Adjust your diet: if you have had kidney stones removed before, your doctor may have tested them to find out what they were composed of. He or she may then advise you to restrict certain foods from your diet that could cause high levels of certain minerals to be present in your urine.
  • Take any medication as advised by your doctor to help prevent further kidney stones from forming.
  • See your doctor if you notice blood in your urine.
  • Try to collect any stones that you pass so that your doctor can test their composition and treat you accordingly.

Main numbers

General enquiries: 020 7935 4444 Appointments: 020 7616 7693 Self-Pay: 020 3219 3315

Contact numbers for service departments

Other numbers

Concierge service: 020 3219 3323International office: 020 3219 3266Invoice and payment enquiries: 020 7616 7708Press office: 020 7616 7676

Your call may be recorded for training and monitoring purposes.

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