Gastroenterology and endoscopy

Gastroenterologists at The London Clinic offer screening (including bowel cancer screening), diagnosis and treatment for diseases that affect any part of the digestive system, from the upper oesophagus, stomach and small intestine right through to the colon, rectum and anus.

Our dedicated endoscopy unit

The London Clinic Endoscopy Unit is a purpose-built, recently refurbished facility which allows complete examination of either the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract or the lower GI tract. Endoscopy is used to investigate all parts of the digestive system. Upper gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy and lower GI endoscopy (colonoscopy) are generally performed by physician or surgeon gastroenterologists who have specialised in these techniques.

Some of our consultants specialise in endoscopic examination of the small bowel and of the pancreatic and bile ducts.

The calm, relaxing environment has recently been upgraded to provide an enhanced environment for our consultants, giving the best possible treatment to our patients.

Endoscopic investigations

Our leading, specialist consultants offer all forms of endoscopic investigation to diagnose problems with the digestive system:

This investigates the oesophagus and stomach. Gastroscopy is used to identify problems such as oesophageal narrowing, heartburn, Barrett’s oesophagus, ulcers, cancer and other conditions.

A video capsule, which looks like a large pill, is swallowed and its on-board camera takes pictures of the inside of your digestive system as it passes through.

 A combination of two types of test - endoscopy and ultrasound. The endoscopist uses an endoscope with an ultrasound probe built into the tip to take samples and create detailed pictures of the body, including the lungs, pancreas, liver, gallbladder, oesophagus and stomach.

ERCP is used to investigate problems with the bile duct or pancreatic duct.

Similar to a gastroscopy but using longer endoscopic equipment to examine further into the small bowel.

These endoscopic tests are done to find out why you may be having swallowing problems, or to assess acid reflux.

This is the most frequent form of endoscopy carried out at The Clinic. The aim of a colonoscopy is to examine the large bowel to investigate the causes of diarrhoea or rectal bleeding. Polyps are routinely removed, reducing the risk of developing colon cancer in the future.

Also known as CTC or virtual colonoscopy (VC), this is an X-Ray scanning technology used to diagnose disorders in your bowel such as bowel cancer, or non-cancerous growths known as polyps.